Features

Tennessee Watson / Wyoming Public Radio

The town of Medicine Bow — population roughly 200 — nearly doubles in size every August for the Battle of Old Wyoming. It’s not a reenacted gunfight as the name might suggest, but a music festival where 24 bands play back-to-back 30-minute sets for 12 hours. 

Texas Western Swing Band Big Cedar Fever On Wyoming Sounds

Aug 6, 2018
Anna Rader

Big Cedar Fever on Wyoming Sounds recorded on 08/06/18.

Stan Honda

A documentary and book explores what happened to the barracks at Heart Mountain detention camp for Japanese Americans after World War Two. The film released in December 2017, “Moving Walls: The Barracks of America’s Concentration Camps,” tells the little-known story of how hundreds of the barracks were sold to veterans to homestead in Northwest Wyoming. Sharon Yamato, the filmmaker, wanted to explore the connection between these two different communities in an effort to create a dialogue. Wyoming Public Radio’s Kamila Kudelska asked Yamato what was the significance of the barracks to the homesteaders.

Cooper McKim

It’s a hot day south of Wheatland, near the small town of Chugwater. Dirt kicks up around passing cars on a long driveway as the sunbeams gold on waving fields of wheat. At the end is the Baker Farm, with old water tanks and rusted antique farm vehicles in front of the home. 

Ivory Brien is Really Good at Basketball, Flathead Reservation, Montana, 2016 by Sue Reynolds.

The new website Everyday Native highlights the use of photography and poetry to help bridge the gap between Native and non-Native students alongside their teachers. 

Maggie Mullen

Football season kicks off soon with the sport still mired in controversy over whether players should stand for the national anthem. A new NFL policy that would force them to do that is now in limbo while the league negotiates with its players. But the underlying debate over whether political protest belongs on the football field is a familiar story to the University of Wyoming.

Caroline Ballard


This month, hundreds of game wardens and conservation officers from around the country and Canada gathered in Cheyenne for the North American Wildlife Enforcement Officers Association’s annual conference. While serious conversations about poaching, large carnivore attacks, and stress were important, the most anticipated event was the Warden Skills Competitions.

Ben Licera


Over the next week, dance students from around the state will come to the University of Wyoming to learn from renowned performers as part of the Snowy Range Summer Dance Festival. This year’s event will feature dancers from the Limón Dance Company based in New York City. They will teach throughout the week, then dance a performance at the festival’s gala. Logan Frances Kruger is a member of and the rehearsal director for the Limón Dance Company. She told Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard that her history with the company started when she was very young.

New York Reggae-Roots Band The Big Takeover On Wyoming Sounds

Jul 18, 2018
Anna Rader

The Big Takeover on Wyoming Sounds recorded 07/18/18

Steve Mattheis

Steve Mattheis is a Jackson native and a wildlife photographer. A couple of years ago, he fell in love with photographing great gray owls. It turns out, they aren’t that easy to find. But he got a hang of it. And this year, one of his striking photos of the owl won the Audubon Society, Grand Prize award. Mattheis speaks with Wyoming Public Radio’s Kamila Kudelska on how he’s learned to spot great gray owls. But first Kudelska asks about the story behind the winning photo.

Country Blues Musician Reverend Freakchild On Wyoming Sounds

Jul 12, 2018
Anna Rader

Reverend Freakchild on Wyoming Sounds recorded 07/12/18.

Nashville-Based Singer-Songwriter Taylor Kropp On Wyoming Sounds

Jul 11, 2018
Anna Rader

Taylor Kropp on Wyoming Sounds recorded 07/11/18.

Steve Mattheis

Jackson native won a national award for a photo of a great gray owl taken in Teton County. The Audubon Society awarded Steve Mattheis the 2018 Grand Prize Winner.

Folk Singer-Songwriter Jennifer Niceley On Wyoming Sounds

Jun 29, 2018
Anna Rader

Jennifer Niceley on Wyoming Sounds recorded 06/29/18.

A year and a half into the Trump presidency and several federal land agencies do not have directors—

including the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Former land managers say the lack of leadership has grave consequences for the future of public lands.


 


Caroline Ballard

A new mural in downtown Laramie will be dedicated as one of the first events of Laramie PrideFest. The mural features notable people affiliated with social justice and civil rights in the state - including suffragists, the University of Wyoming Black 14, and the action angels that blocked Westboro Baptist Church protestors at the Matthew Shepard murder trial almost 20 years ago. Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard visited the mural and spoke with the artist behind it, Adrienne Vetter.

Brenda Mallory

Portland, Oregon-based artist Brenda Mallory received the Ucross Fellowship for Native American Artists. She will spend a month in Ucross, receive a stipend of $2,000, and the residency will culminate in an exhibition of her work.

National Museum of Wildlife Art/James Prosek

In recent years, scientists have been astounded to learn how far large animals like elk, pronghorn and mule deer migrate in Wyoming. But a new show at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson looks at both the great and small creatures that travel to and fro to reach the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards sat down with painter and writer James Prosek to talk about evolution, language and whether to name waterfalls.

Kamila Kudelska


A new permanent exhibition at the Draper Natural History Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West focuses on golden eagle research but it also looks at how golden eagles have been and still are significant to the Plains Indian people.

Kamila Kudelska

When museums have special exhibitions, what visitors don't know is that it takes years for the exhibit to evolve from a concept to the moment you are standing in front of that famous work of art. The Whitney Western Art Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West just opened its new exhibit featuring the famous Western American artist, Albert Bierstadt. But the process behind securing loans is not so easy.

National Museum of Wildlife Art/James Prosek

A new exhibit at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson highlights the artwork of painter and nature writer, James Prosek, one of three people in the show exploring the meaning of animal migration.

Albert Bierstadt—He’s a late 19th-century artist, most well-known for his majestic landscape paintings of the Wind River Range, Yellowstone and the American West. But there's more to him than paintings of grand open spaces. The Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody and the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma worked together to create an exhibit exploring Bierstadt’s influence on conservation and wildlife management in America. It’s called Albert Bierstadt: Witness to the Changing West. Kamila Kudelska speaks talks to three museum curators as they tell the little-known story of a beloved American artist. 

Artist Estelle Ishigo was one of the few white women that went to a Wyoming Japanese-American internment camp. Estelle and her husband were imprisoned at Heart Mountain in 1942. During their three years at the camp, Estelle painted watercolors portraying the daily life. A new exhibit at Heart Mountain Interpretive Center called The Mountain Was Our Secret displays a collection of Estelle’s work. 

Aaron Linsdau

Have you ever wanted to pack up your bag, leave everyday life behind, and follow in the footsteps of famous polar explorers? Well, author and explorer Aaron Linsdau does just that — trekking solo to remote locations like Alaska, Greenland, and Antarctica. He has also translated his experiences into a career as a motivational speaker and will be speaking at the Wyoming Writers Conference in Dubois in June. Linsdau told Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard he first started thinking about becoming an explorer when he picked up backpacking in California.

Harry Jackson Trust

On June 1, over 5,000 works of art by Harry Jackson will be handed over from the family trust to the Harry Jackson Institute. Harry Jackson is best known for his western art, but he also was part of the abstract expressionism movement, among the likes of Jackson Pollock and Joan Mitchell.

Spoken Words 21: Jeffrey Lockwood—Murder On The Fly

May 29, 2018
Cover Photo Jeffrey Lockwood and Ted Brummond, UW photo services

Jeffrey Lockwood continues his “Riley the Exterminator” mystery series, this time as Riley tries to solve a missing person case at the same time California’s agricultural industry is threatened by a Mediterranean fruit fly invasion. Lockwood discusses his love for weaving great storytelling, science, philosophy and crime in these mysteries.

Courtesy of the Japanese American National Museum, Allen Eaton Collection

The “Mountain Was Our Secret” is the title of a new exhibit at Heart Mountain Interpretive Center. Heart Mountain was the site where 14,000 Japanese-Americans were incarcerated from 1942 to 1945.

1996. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Israel of Aspen, Colorado. Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

George Custer is most famous for the battle he did not survive: The Battle of the Little Bighorn. Popularly known as “Custer’s Last Stand,” it took place in Montana Territory against a coalition of Native American tribes. But a new exhibition at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West portrays Custer and his wife, Libby’s, personal possessions in an effort to create a picture not focused on his last battle.

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

This week the second symposium dedicated to firearm museums and collections is being held at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

Last year marked the first time firearm collections and museums came together to discuss the industry. There are about two dozen prominent firearm collections and museums in the United States. This year the symposium concentrates on the ethics of firearms in museums.

Kamila Kudelska

The Draper Natural History Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West will open a new permanent exhibition on June 10. The exhibition focuses on the last ten years of research on golden eagle activity in the Bighorn Basin. Golden eagles are a top predator so by studying the top of the food chain, researchers are learning not just about the bird but also about the dynamics of animals they eat and the ecosystem they live in.  

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