August 24th, 2018

Credit Cooper McKim

Listen to the full show here.

Affordable Clean Energy Renews Hope In Coal Country, But Should It?

The Trump administration's rollback of coal plant regulations had renewed hope that some plants might stay open a little longer. The share of coal in the country's energy mix has dropped dramatically over the past decade. But even with the industry-supported policy, there's concern this latest lifeline isn't enough to stop that decline.

Some Western Lawmakers Worry Trump Administration Sage Grouse Plan Could Backfire

Some western lawmakers are up in arms over a Trump administration announcement that eases the requirements for drilling near sage grouse. For now, Wyoming isn't impacted by the announcement, though that could change.

Is There Water Left To Be Developed In The Colorado River Basin?

The Colorado River is running low on water. The lifeline that slakes the thirst of 40 million southwestern residents is projected to hit a historic low mark within two years, forcing mandatory cuts to water deliveries in Arizona, Nevada and Mexico.   

Facing exceptional drought conditions, cities throughout the watershed this summer have imposed mandatory water restrictions, ranchers have begun selling off cows they’re unable to feed, and the river’s reservoirs are headed toward levels not seen since they filled decades ago.

Archeology Detectives Follow Clues To Solve Mystery Of Missing Mammoth

University of Wyoming anthropologists are putting out a call out for help looking for a lost mammoth. How do you lose a six-ton extinct animal that lived 13,000 years ago? Well, you find a few of its bones but lose track over the decades of exactly where they were found. But now some clues have come to the surface. Wyoming Public Radio’s Melodie Edwards sat down with the University of Wyoming anthropology professor Todd Surovell, the detective trying to put all the clues together. 

The Theories Behind Mark Gordon's Victory

State Treasurer Mark Gordon won the Wyoming Republican Primary Election by seven percent of the vote. Some in the GOP who favored other candidates want to blame that on the possibility that Gordon attracted some Democrats who switched party affiliation the day of the primary. The other theory was that a large number of more conservative candidates split votes, which allowed Gordon to win. However, there's also the chance that Gordon, who came in as the favorite, was the preferred candidate.

Albany County Works To Break School To Prison Pipeline

Earlier this summer, the Governor's Advisory Council on Juvenile Justice gave Albany County the Neal D. Madson Award for its groundbreaking work with juvenile offenders. Since 2014, Albany County says it's reduced the number of young people who end up in secure detention by 34 percent. That's when the county formed a Community Juvenile Service Board and started a diversion program, which advocates say has been good for kids and the state's bottom-line.

Beavers: An Unlikely Solution To Western Drought

It's no secret that water is a problem in the West. Historically, the humble beaver helped maintain wetlands and ponds across the arid landscape but their populations were decimated during the fur trade and their numbers dropped dramatically from 400 million to just 100,000 by the turn of the twentieth century. But Canada's national animal is making a comeback and scientists think they have an important role to play as our region fights drought.

Former Con-Artist Has Tips For Avoiding Fraud

If you have seen the Steven Spielberg movie Catch Me If You Can, you are no doubt familiar with the name Frank Abagnale. The former teen con artist is now one of the world's most respected authorities on forgery, embezzlement and secure documents. He is now a Fraud Watch Ambassador for AARP and spoke to Bob Beck this week in Casper.